UNDERSTANDING SATELLITE AIS AND THE SDPOB ADVANTAGE

ORBCOMM WHITE PAPER:

UNDERSTANDING SATELLITE AIS AND THE SDPOB ADVANTAGE

Abstract:  Satellite  Automatic  Identification  Systems  (S-AIS) provide  a  means  to  track  the  location  of  vessels  anywhere  in the  world,  especially  over  open  oceans  and  beyond  the  reach of  terrestrial-based  AIS  systems.  In  this  paper,  we  will  examine the  facts  that  are  essential  when  deciding  on  which  Satellite AIS  system  to  use.  This  includes  a  closer  look  at  whether Spectrum  Decollision  Processing  (SDP)  is  effective  on-board a  satellite;  the  advantages  of  multiple  satellites  frequently passing  over  the  same  area  to  collect  AIS  data  and  the  benefit of  an  extensive  ground  station  infrastructure.

Brief  Overview  of  How  AIS  Works

Class-A  AIS  transponders  are  installed  on  most  vessels over  300GT  on  international  voyages  while  many  smaller vessels  are  outfitted  with  the  simpler  and  lower  cost Class-B  AIS  transponders.  In  both  cases,  the  transponders automatically  broadcast  information,  such  as  the  vessel’s position,  speed,  and  navigational  status,  at  regular intervals  via  a  VHF  transmitter  built  into  the  transponder.

The  signals  are  received  by  AIS  transponders  fitted  on other  ships;  on  land  based  systems,  such  as  Vessel  Traffic Services  (VTS)  systems;  and  on  AIS  satellites.

AIS  Terminology

AutomaticIdentification  System  (AIS)  is  an automatic  tracking  system  used  for  identifying  and locating  vessels  by  electronically  exchanging  data with  other  nearby  ships,  AIS  base  stations,  and satellites.

  • SatelliteAIS  (S-AIS)  is  the  term  used  to  describe when  satellites  are  used  to  detect  AIS  signatures.
  • Spectrum Decollision  Processing  (SDP)  is  the application  of  an  algorithm  where  AIS  radio  signals are  digitized  and  then  filtered  using  software  tools until  the  individual  AIS  signatures  from  the  vessels can  be  detected.
  • OnboardProcessing  (OBP)  is  the  basic processing  of  AIS  data  onboard  the  satellites, instead  of  the  ground  equipment.
  • Spectrum Decollision  Processing  Onboard (SDPOB)  is  the  technology  for  processing  AIS  data onboard  ORBCOMM  satellites.  It  provides  the ability  to  detect  more  AIS  signatures  in  the  most efficient  and  expedient  method  available.

ORBCOMM  SATELLITE  AIS  WHITE  PAPER

ORBCOMM’s  high  performance  AIS  satellites  and  even more  powerful  next-generation  OG2  AIS-enabled satellites  meet  these  requirements  and  are  able  to perform  Spectrum  Decollision  Processing  On-Board (SDPOB)  the  satellites.  This  capability  dramatically increases  the  ability  to  detect  multiple  AIS  signals  in  and decreases  the  latency  in  AIS-data  collection  and  reporting.

When  comparing  data  collected  and  processed  using the  ORBCOMM  SDPOB  method  with  the  SDP  by  other systems  for  data  over  the  same  area,  ORBCOMM detected  57%  more  vessels.

Fact  #1:  Extracting  AIS  information  using SDP  can  be  done  on  board  a  satellite

In  any  given  area,  there  may  be  many  vessels  that  are transmitting  their  AIS  information.  To  be  able  to  decode the  vessel’s  information  from  the  VHF  signals  requires specialized  equipment  and  methodologies.

Spectrum  Decollision  Processing  (SDP)  is  the  application of  an  algorithm  where  AIS  messages  are  extracted from  the  noisy  VHF  environment.  SDP  is  typically  done on  terrestrial-based  AIS  equipment  but  can  occur  on a  satellite  if  there  is  sufficient  power  and  processing capability.

For  organizations  that  rely  on  AIS  data,  detecting  more vessels  means  a  more  accurate  view  of  who  is  present  in an  area  and  better  vessel  management.

Summary:  ORBCOMM’s  SDPOB  dramatically  increases the  ability  to  detect  AIS  signals  and  shortens  the  time  of AIS-data  collection  and  reporting.

Satellite  Passes  per  Day

Multiple  satellite  passes  increase  the  detection and  refresh  detection  rates.  The  number  of  passes depends  on  the  location  of  the  vessel.

Using  the  ORBCOMM  network  Brazil  (at  -5  Latitude) currently  has  54  (2015)  passes  per  day.  Assuming satellites  are  in  view  of  a  vessel  for  10  to  12  minutes per  pass,  vessels  at  -5  latitude  are  in  satellite  view  for 9.1  hours.  This  will  increase  to  15  hours  (91  passes) in  mid-2015  with  the  launch  of  11  of  ORBCOMM`s next  generation  OG2  satellites.

Argentina/Australia  (at -35  Latitude)  currently  has 70  passes  per  day  (2015).  This  means  that  currently vessels  at  this  latitude  are  in  view  of  AIS  satellite  for 12  hours  per  day.  This  will  increase  to  21.7  hours (127  passes)  per  day  with  the  launch  of  11  more  OG2 satellites.

Fact  #2:  Multiple  satellites  passing  over the  same  area  increases AIS-signal detection

AIS  messages  are  broadcast  at  different  time  intervals from  every  few  seconds  to  every  three  minutes depending  on  message  type,  speed  and  status  of  the vessel.

The  laws  of  probability  come  into  play  when  looking  at the  likelihood  of  detecting  and  collecting  an  AIS  message when  you  are  in  view  of  the  vessel  for  minutes,  as  is  the case  for  AIS-enabled  Low-Earth  Orbit  (LEO)  satellites.

The  probability  of  a  LEO  satellite  detecting  an  AIS  signal increases  as  you  spend  more  time  over  the  vessel  or more  satellites  pass  over  a  vessel.

ORBCOMM’s  planned  constellation  of  nineteen  (19)  AIS-enabled  satellites  will  be  able  to  yield  better  and  more  AIS data  than  any  other  constellation.

Summary:  More  frequent  satellite  passes  over  a vessel  increases  the  likelihood  of  AIS-signal  detection. ORBCOMM’s  satellite  constellation  offers  more opportunities  for  AIS  data  detection  leading  to  better vessel  management.

Fact  #3:  Latency  of  AIS  data  delivery  is important  for  maritime  awareness

Latency  of  the  AIS  data  delivery  can  be  affected  by two  main  factors:  satellite  constellation  and  ground station  infrastructure.  When  the  satellite  receives  an  AIS message,  it  stores  the  message  internally  until  the  satellite becomes  connected  to  a  ground  station.  The  satellite then  downloads  all  the  messages  received  since  the  last ground  station  connection.

Having  a  large  network  of  ground  stations  strategically located  to  match  the  satellite  constellation  considerably reduces  the  latency  of  the  delivery  of  data.

ORBCOMM’s  ground  station  infrastructure  of  16 operational  Gateway  Earth  Stations  (GES)  around  the world  and  up  to  19  AIS-enabled  satellites  offer  a  much reduced  satellite-to-ground  station  delivery  time,  enabling latencies  in  the  order  of  minutes  (see  side  table).

Summary:  ORBCOMM’s  geographically  diverse  ground station  infrastructure  and  satellites  offer  a  much  reduced satellite-to-ground  station  delivery  time,  enabling  latencies in  the  order  of  minutes.  This  provides  the  ability  to  have near  real-time  maritime  domain  awareness.

Latency

Latency  in  reception  of  AIS  data  is  partly  determined by  the  location  and  number  of  ground  stations.  For the  ORBCOMM  network,  the  latencies  are  as  follows:

Brazil  (50%  mean  average):

  • <20  min  –  current  (2015)
  • <3  min  –  with  the  launch  of  11  more  OG2  satellites

Argentina  (50%  mean  average):

  • <20  min  –  current  (2015)
  • <1  min  –  with  the  launch  of  11  more  OG2  satellites

These  near  real-time  latencies  ensure  that organizations  get  the  most  accurate  view  of  which vessels  are  in  a  specific  area.

ORBCOMM’s  Experience  in  AIS

The  ability  to  collect  AIS  data  from  space  is  very  complex  and  involves  numerous  factors  that  are  dynamic  by  nature.

ORBCOMM  has  studied  space-based  signal  detection  in  the  VHF  range  for  nearly  20  years  and  has  excelled  on  AIS  data collection  since  2001.  The  company  has  collected  and  analyzed  billions  of  AIS  messages  and  developed  the  technology for  the  U.S.  Coast  Guard  and  other  maritime  agencies.

This  experience  has  led  to  ORBCOMM’s  SDPOB  approach  for accurately  detecting  and  collecting  AIS  data.  ORBCOMM’s constellation  of  19  satellites  and  16  ground  earth  stations  will  provide  the  best-in-class  satellite  AIS  system.

For  more  information  on  the  ORBCOMM  Satellite  AIS  system,  please  contact  us  at  1-703-433-6525  or satelliteais@orbcomm.com.

About  ORBCOMM  Inc.

ORBCOMM  is  a  global  provider  of  Machine-to-Machine  (M2M)  solutions.  Its  customers  include  Caterpillar  Inc.,  Doosan  Infracore America,  Hitachi  Construction  Machinery,  Hyundai  Heavy  Industries,  I.D.  Systems,  Inc.,  Komatsu  Ltd.,  Cartrack  (Pty.)  Ltd.,  and  Volvo Construction  Equipment,  among  other  industry  leaders.  By  means  of  a  global  network  of  low-earth  orbit  (LEO)  satellites  and accompanying  ground  infrastructure  as  well  as  our  Tier  One  cellular  partners,  ORBCOMM’s  low-cost  and  reliable  two-way  data communication  services  track,  monitor  and  control  mobile  and  fixed  assets  in  our  core  markets:  commercial  transportation;  heavy equipment;  industrial  fixed  assets;  marine;  and  homeland  security.

ORBCOMM  is  an  innovator  and  leading  provider  of  tracking,  monitoring  and  control  services  for  the  transportation  market.  Under  its ReeferTrak®,  GenTrakTM,  GlobalTrak®,  and  CargoWatch®  brands,  the  company  provides  customers  with  the  ability  to  proactively monitor,  manage  and  remotely  control  their  cold  chain  and  dry  transport  assets.  Additionally,  ORBCOMM  provides  Automatic

Identification  System  (AIS)  data  services  for  vessel  tracking  and  to  improve  maritime  safety  to  government  and  commercial  customers worldwide.  ORBCOMM  is  headquartered  in  Rochelle  Park,  New  Jersey  and  has  its  Innovation  &  Network  Control  Center  in  Sterling, Virginia.

For  more  information,  visit  http://www.orbcomm.com

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s