Copyright Notice for https://beckh.wordpress.com

Copyright notice for https://beckh.wordpress.com Credit 1.1     This document/website post for https://beckh.wordpress.com and the streams to Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Twitter, a.o. social media was created using a template from SEQ Legal (http://www.seqlegal.com). Copyright notice 2.1     Copyright (c) November 2010, Joachim Beckh. 2.2     Subject to the express provisions of this notice: (a)     we, together with our licensors, own […]

Rate this:

Blitz & Anker

Blitz & Anker Informationstechnik, Geschichte & Hintergründe. Neue Entwicklungen in der Informationstechnik (IT) beeinflussen unmittelbar den Informationsaustausch in Politik, Wirtschaft und Militär. Schon in frühesten Zeiten konnte der schnelle Transport einer Nachricht über Sieg oder Niederlage entscheiden. Marconi, Morse und Bell wurden als technische Wegbereiter weltweit bekannt. In Deutschland erhielten die Pioniere wie z.B. Reis, […]

Rate this:

Maritime Definitions

Maritime Definitions Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA) The International Maritime Organization (IMO) defines Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA): “The effective understanding of anything associated with the maritime domain that could impact upon the security, safety, economy, or environment.” Amendments to the International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue [IAMSAR] Manual, 24 May 2010 In the Maritime Common […]

Rate this:

Knowledge

Knowledge is a detailed familiarity with, or understanding of, a person, thing or situation. It can include facts and information, as well as understanding that is gained through experience. Therefore knowledge or wisdom is dependant from sensory perception. Since the way we receive information in a context – a message – is very individually depending on the cultural, social and […]

Rate this:

Open Source Tactical Geospacial Intelligence (OSTGI)

Open Source Tactical Geospacial Intelligence (OSTGI) All countries desire to control their borders. Most currently rely on fixed based ground sensors to conduct air and surface surveillance. Some also use aviation based radar platforms such as airborne platforms, tethered aerostats, and other mobile sensor systems. Though effective in the air surveillance mission, none of these […]

Rate this:

UNDERSTANDING SATELLITE AIS AND THE SDPOB ADVANTAGE

ORBCOMM WHITE PAPER: UNDERSTANDING SATELLITE AIS AND THE SDPOB ADVANTAGE Abstract:  Satellite  Automatic  Identification  Systems  (S-AIS) provide  a  means  to  track  the  location  of  vessels  anywhere  in the  world,  especially  over  open  oceans  and  beyond  the  reach of  terrestrial-based  AIS  systems.  In  this  paper,  we  will  examine the  facts  that  are  essential  when  deciding  on  which  Satellite AIS  system  to  use.  This  includes  a  closer  look  at  whether Spectrum  Decollision  Processing  (SDP)  is  effective  on-board a  satellite;  the  advantages  of  multiple  satellites  frequently passing  over  the  same  area  to  collect  AIS  data  and  the  benefit of  an  extensive  ground  station  infrastructure. Brief  Overview  of  How  AIS  Works Class-A  AIS  transponders  are  installed  on  most  vessels over  300GT  on  international  voyages  while  many  smaller vessels  are  outfitted  with  the  simpler  and  lower  cost Class-B  AIS  transponders.  In  both  cases,  the  transponders automatically  broadcast  information,  such  as  the  vessel’s position,  speed,  and  navigational  status,  at  regular intervals  via  a  VHF  transmitter  built  into  the  transponder. The  signals  are  received  by  AIS  transponders  fitted  on other  ships;  on  land  based  systems,  such  as  Vessel  Traffic Services  (VTS)  systems;  and  on  AIS  satellites. AIS  Terminology AutomaticIdentification  System  (AIS)  is  an automatic  tracking  system  used  for  identifying  and locating  vessels  by  electronically  exchanging  data with  other  nearby  ships,  AIS  base  stations,  and satellites. SatelliteAIS  (S-AIS)  is  the  term  used  to  describe when  satellites  are  used  to  detect  AIS  signatures. Spectrum Decollision  Processing  (SDP)  is  the application  of  an  algorithm  where  AIS  radio  signals are  digitized  and  then  filtered  using  software  tools until  the  individual  AIS  signatures  from  the  vessels can  be  detected. OnboardProcessing  (OBP)  is  the  basic processing  of  AIS  data  onboard  the  satellites, instead  of  the  ground  equipment. Spectrum Decollision  Processing  Onboard (SDPOB)  is  the  technology  for  processing  AIS  data onboard  ORBCOMM  satellites.  It  provides  the ability  to  detect  more  AIS  signatures  in  the  most efficient  and  expedient  method  available. ORBCOMM  SATELLITE  AIS  WHITE  PAPER ORBCOMM’s  high  performance  AIS  satellites  and  even more  powerful  next-generation  OG2  AIS-enabled satellites  meet  these  requirements  and  are  able  to perform  Spectrum  Decollision  Processing  On-Board (SDPOB)  the  satellites.  This  capability  dramatically increases  the  ability  to  detect  multiple  AIS  signals  in  and decreases  the  latency  in  AIS-data  collection  and  reporting. When  comparing  data  collected  and  processed  using the  ORBCOMM  SDPOB  method  with  the  SDP  by  other systems  for  data  over  the  same  area,  ORBCOMM detected  57%  more  vessels. Fact  #1:  Extracting  AIS  information  using SDP  can  be  done  on  board  a  satellite In  any  given  area,  there  may  be  many  vessels  that  are transmitting  their  AIS  information.  To  be  able  to  decode the  vessel’s  information  from  the  VHF  signals  requires specialized  equipment  and  methodologies. Spectrum  Decollision  Processing  (SDP)  is  the  application of  an  algorithm  where  AIS  messages  are  extracted from  the  noisy  VHF  environment.  SDP  is  typically  done on  terrestrial-based  AIS  equipment  but  can  occur  on a  satellite  if  there  is  sufficient  power  and  processing capability. For  organizations  that  rely  on  AIS  data,  detecting  more vessels  means  a  more  accurate  view  of  who  is  present  in an  area  and  better  vessel  management. Summary:  ORBCOMM’s  SDPOB  dramatically  increases the  ability  to  detect  AIS  signals  and  shortens  the  time  of AIS-data  collection  and  reporting. Satellite  Passes  per  Day Multiple  satellite  passes  increase  the  detection and  refresh  detection  rates.  The  number  of  passes depends  on  the  location  of  the  vessel. Using  the  ORBCOMM  network  Brazil  (at  -5  Latitude) currently  has  54  (2015)  passes  per  day.  Assuming satellites  are  in  view  of  a  vessel  for  10  to  12  minutes per  pass,  vessels  at  -5  latitude  are  in  satellite  view  for 9.1  hours.  This  will  increase  to  15  hours  (91  passes) in  mid-2015  with  the  launch  of  11  of  ORBCOMM`s next  generation  OG2  satellites. Argentina/Australia  (at -35  Latitude)  currently  has 70  passes  per  day  (2015).  This  means  that  currently vessels  at  this  latitude  are  in  view  of  AIS  satellite  for 12  hours  per  day.  This  will  increase  to  21.7  hours (127  passes)  per  day  with  the  launch  of  11  more  OG2 satellites. Fact  #2:  Multiple  satellites  passing  over the  same  area  increases AIS-signal detection AIS  messages  are  broadcast  at  different  time  intervals from  every  few  seconds  to  every  three  minutes depending  on  message  type,  speed  and  status  of  the vessel. The  laws  of  probability  come  into  play  when  looking  at the  likelihood  of  detecting  and  collecting  an  AIS  message when  you  are  in  view  of  the  vessel  for  minutes,  as  is  the case  for  AIS-enabled  Low-Earth  Orbit  (LEO)  satellites. The  probability  of  a  LEO  satellite  detecting  an  AIS  signal increases  as  you  spend  more  time  over  the  vessel  or more  satellites  pass  over  a  vessel. ORBCOMM’s  planned  constellation  of  nineteen  (19)  AIS-enabled  satellites  will  be  able  to  yield  better  and  more  AIS data  than  any  other  constellation. Summary:  More  frequent  satellite  passes  over  a vessel  increases  the  likelihood  of  AIS-signal  detection. ORBCOMM’s  satellite  constellation  offers  more opportunities  for  AIS  data  detection  leading  to  better vessel  management. Fact  #3:  Latency  of  AIS  data  delivery  is important  for  maritime  awareness Latency  of  the  AIS  data  delivery  can  be  affected  by two  main  factors:  satellite  constellation  and  ground station  infrastructure.  When  the  satellite  receives  an  AIS message,  it  stores  the  message  internally  until  the  satellite becomes  connected  to  a  ground  station.  The  satellite then  downloads  all  the  messages  received  since  the  last ground  station  connection. Having  a  large  network  of  ground  stations  strategically located  to  match  the  satellite  constellation  considerably reduces  the  latency  of  the  delivery  of  data. ORBCOMM’s  ground  station  infrastructure  of  16 operational  Gateway  Earth  Stations  (GES)  around  the world  and  up  to  19  AIS-enabled  satellites  offer  a  much reduced  satellite-to-ground  station  delivery  time,  enabling latencies  in  the  order  of  minutes  (see  side  table). Summary:  ORBCOMM’s  geographically  diverse  ground station  infrastructure  and  satellites  offer  a  much  reduced satellite-to-ground  station  delivery  time,  enabling  latencies in  the  order  of  minutes.  This  provides  the  ability  to  have near  real-time  maritime  domain  awareness. Latency Latency  in  reception  of  AIS  data  is  partly  determined by  the  location  and  number  of  ground  stations.  For the  ORBCOMM  network,  the  latencies  are  as  follows: Brazil  (50%  mean  average): <20  min  –  current  (2015) <3  min  –  with  the  launch  of  11  more  OG2  satellites Argentina  (50%  mean  average): <20  min  –  current  (2015) […]

Rate this:

2015 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog. Here’s an excerpt: A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 4,100 times in 2015. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 3 trips to carry that many people. Click here to […]

Rate this: